The Eugenics Wars Vol I: The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh (Star Trek)

The Eugenics Wars Vol I:  The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh (Star Trek) - Greg Cox This is a hard book to review on its own because it is less than half of a complete story. It doesn't even completely cover the "rise" part of the title.

For what is there, this is a book about Kahn but not starring Kahn. Instead, our old friends Gary Seven and Roberta Lincoln are back and on a mission to keep genetic engineering from becoming the earth's new crisis. In this particular volume, Kahn is growing up in a world where, even as a particularly gifted human, he is helpless to stop humanity from hurting itself.

It has a very Star Trek moral that disregard for individual lives is inhuman. Seven and Roberta are the human side, working to guide humanity in nonviolent ways, while Kahn is the inhuman, willing to set ethics aside to carve humanity into his vision of perfection.

There are a few too many cultural name-drops, so that at times the book feels like it is set in a museum exhibit of the 70s and 80s instead of actually existing in those times, but when it manages to break through that facade it is a lot of fun and an interesting look at the circumstances that brought about Star Trek's most memorable villain.

I don't dread the next volume (I've already committed to reading it), though I have my reservations.